On Cultural Preservation and Local Arts

“…we all speak from a particular place, out of a particular history, out of a particular experience, a particular culture, without being contained by that position…” – Stuart Hall The wonderful potential of possibility contained in that statement by Stuart Hall can be an empowering thing, especially when those places, histories, experiences, and cultures that […]

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The Limits of Our Empathy

In early January last year, the award-winning Nigerian-American writer Teju Cole wrote an essay in the wake of the Charle Hebdo shootings in Paris. In that piece, titled “Unmournable Bodies“, he explored the myth of The West as an amalgamation of serene societies being provoked into violent action by savages. Later in the same essay, […]

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The Quiet Violence of Being

The day before I put the proverbial pen to paper to write this, one of the most prestigious places of learning in the world decided not to remove the name of a forefather of the confederacy from one of its residential colleges. John C. Calhoun, an alumnus of Yale, is most famous today for his […]

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A Legacy: The Sea and Verna Penn Moll

The business of excavating the history of these islands of the northeast Caribbean is a funny thing. Firstly, there is a paucity of texts that deal with the history of the British Virgin Islands. The most popularly known and read publications are perhaps Vernon Pickering’s A Concise History of the British Virgin Islands (1987) and […]

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‘Before a Raging Sea’: The Poetry of Alphaeus O. Norman

Anegadian Alphaeus Osario Norman (1885-1942) may have been the most skilled poet of form these islands have produced. Unfortunately, his poems are not readily available for reading, most easily accessed in time capsule documents like 1834-1984: 150 Years of Emancipation published by the Ministry of Education and Culture or in books of devotional and autobiographical […]

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